Lamb Nutrition Information

Lamb is an excellent source of protein. It also provides B vitamins, zinc and iron. The leanest cuts of lamb are trimmed leg and loin.
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Choose Your Cut

  • Classic leg of lamb is perfect for roasting, and comes in bone-in or boneless varieties.
  • Shoulder cuts are less expensive and are available in a variety of cuts — for roasts, chops, stew meat — and more.
  • Elegant loin cuts are ideal for thick chops, medallions, and boneless roasts.
  • Patties, cubes, and strips are derived from larger cuts of lamb, and are suitable in an endless array of recipes.

Look for meat that is fine textured and firm that has red coloring and white marbling. The fat trim should be firm, white, and not too thick. The USDA quality grades are reliable guides.  

 

 


Lamb Nutritional Information

3 oz. (84g) cooked serving; fat trimmed to 1/8” 

Calories

Calories from Fat

Total Fat (g)

Saturated Fat (g)

Total Carbs (g)

Cholesterol (g)

Sodium (g)

Protein (g)

Iron (% of DV)* 

Shank, Roasted

180

90

10

4

0

75

55

22

10

Shoulder Arm Chop, Braised

280

170

19

8

0

100

60

26

10

Shoulder Blade Chop, Braised

280

180

20

8

0

95

65

24

10

Rib Roast, Roasted

290

210

23

10

0

80

60

18

8

Loin Chop, Broiled

250

160

17

7

0

85

65

22

8

Leg, Whole, Roasted

200

110

12

5

0

75

55

22

10

Leg, Sirloin Half, Roasted

240

150

17

7

0

80

60

21

10

Leg, Shank Half, Roasted

180

90

10

4

0

75

55

23

10

*Not a significant source of dietary fiber, sugars, vitamin A, vitamin C, and calcium.

 

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Sources:
United States Department of Agriculture Lamb. Good For You!
USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 23