Peppermint
Rules the Season

Peppermint past, present & recipes!

Shop Peppermint

Peppermint past, present & recipes!

Peppermint, Patty?

Why, yes, of course? Who says “no” to this all-time classic often synonymous with the winter season, but invariably found in comestibles all year round (can you say “mojitos)? You’ve got your classic cane, those old-fashioned sticks that melt like sweet powder on your tongue, ice cream galore, the infamous Patty, mochas, liquors, liqueurs, gum, Life Savers® (yes, the breath thing is a huge component) and even recipes like mint pesto and quinoa, salads and jellies! It’s like a wonder herb! And most say (unless you have a black thumb — we’re not mentioning any names), that it grows like a banshee! This is because it’s a plant that spreads with long runners, which root at nodes and create daughter plants. Most call it invasive, some of us (again, no names), elusive.


In Mint Condition
All of this from a humble leaf indigenous to the Middle East and Europe, one that is actually a natural hybrid of watermint and spearmint. Watermint is actually a shore plant used to control erosion and has less menthol than peppermint, although it still adds a lovely scent to its surroundings and flavor to foods. Spearmint is often used like peppermint but is a subtler version with only 5% menthol. Peppermint has a whopping 40%! We’re not sure how two lower-producing mints bring out the powerhouse of peppermint, but why question a good thing?


Peppermint is best when harvested in the morning before the sun dries out the oil in the leaves. It is the oil content that contains the menthol flavor, so the more of it the better. Still, we have been known to dry mint for use during the winter season. It’s not a bad way to go.

U.S. Mint
Despite peppermint’s origins, 75% of it is currently produced in the United States and peppermint oil is the most widely used essential oil in existence. And that brings us to the organic association of peppermint with winter. It’s said that it all started with the candy cane in Germany back in 1670. Ends up, a choir master wanted to keep the kids quiet in church during the long holiday services and asked a candymaker to craft candy sticks to keep them busy. The candymaker made canes and BOOM!

Eventually, these sticks became super popular in Europe and by the 19th century were striped and peppermint! They crossed the Atlantic in the late 1800s and the rest is history. Back to winter. Candy canes, because of their festive red and white stripes and clear use to bribe kids quiet, became associated with the winter holidays and then branched out from there: the peppermint, that is; it is rare to find a cane in July.

In celebration of this confectionary legacy, we bring you some of our very favorite peppermint recipes. Really, it’s the least we cane do!

Holiday Bark

Holiday Bark

Peppermint Crinkle Cookies

Peppermint Crinkle Cookies

Peppermint Bark

Peppermint Bark